Three Things to Consider Before Buying a Motorcycle

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A motorcycle is an exciting choice of vehicle. Motorcyclists always talk about the sense of freedom that they get when they drive through empty backroads or outskirts, enjoying the wind on their face and the warm sunshine. It’s an experience that appeals to many people who don’t think much about the constraints of sitting inside their car for hours when the traffic gets bad.

If you think the same thing and are contemplating buying a motorcycle, this article is for you.

Is It the Right Vehicle for You?

A motorcycle may cost less than a car, but it is still a major purchase that you’ll need to think about. There are also factors to think about, such as your needs, habits, and safety.

Below are the five things you need to think about first.

1. Does it fit your lifestyle?

A motorcycle is really more of a lifestyle choice. It has to fit your personality, otherwise, you might not enjoy it as much as you should. This doesn’t mean that you should join a motorcycle club, but owning a motorcycle would mean that you’ll be going to many places alone or with just one other companion. If this is a type of road trip that you’ve dreamed of having, if riding to remote places that cannot be reached with a car is exactly the kind of adventure you’re looking for, then perhaps a bicycle is really for you.

If, however, you have a family or if your family are fearful for your safety, you might have to reconsider buying a motorcycle. Motorcycle riders are more vulnerable to road accidents. Their mortality rate is 27 times higher than car passengers and drivers. Your family would rather that you stay safe than call a motorcycle accident attorney one day, so understand their concern if they object to your buying a motorcycle.

2. Are you qualified to drive it?

By all accounts, learning to ride a bicycle is no harder than learning to drive a car. You do need to be a bit braver, though, because you essentially only have a helmet and elbow and knee pads for protection should your driving lessons go awry.

You’re only legally allowed to drive a motorcycle if you have a class M1 or class M2 license. You may or may not have to take motorcycle driving lessons, depending on your age and driving skill level. To earn a license, you need to pass a vision exam and a series of riding skills tests.

Anyone who has a driver’s license may, however, drive a rental motorcycle for 48 hours or less even if the license doesn’t have a class M2 endorsement.

You’ll have an advantage if you’re already a licensed driver and had practiced driving a motorcycle beforehand. If you’re starting from zero, you need to commit to learning how to drive a motorcycle safely, preferably from an accredited driving school in your city or state.

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3. Can you afford the costs that come with owning a motorcycle?

The cost of owning a motorcycle doesn’t start and end with buying the vehicle. You also need to pay for vehicle registration fees, fuel, insurance, and maintenance. If you must take out a loan to buy the motorcycle, you also have to take into account the interest plus monthly premiums.

The biggest expense for motorcycle owners, however, is maintenance. Motorcycles need constant maintenance and care, otherwise, the driving quality will noticeably decrease. So if you’re thinking of buying a motorcycle because it is cheaper than a car, consider the out-of-pocket costs for the regular maintenance that your motorcycle will need.

There’s no need to rush buying a motorcycle; it’s better to have it when you can finally enjoy it to the fullest, not when your lifestyle, priorities, and finances still can’t accommodate it.

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